Opening Reception At Studio Oh: Tonight, 12/12, In Chicago Arts District

Preacher Man

Preacher Man, by Leon Sarantos

Join us this Friday! Come celebrate the latest exhibition at Studio Oh in Pilsen.  Then explore 30+ creative spaces for 2nd Fridays Gallery Night in the Chicago Arts District.

When:  You’re invited to the opening reception this Friday, December 12, from 6 – 10 PM.  It is free and open to the public.  Enjoy light refreshments and see vivid, engaging artwork.The art is on display until Sunday, January 18th.

What:  “Who’s Afraid Of Red” – The exhibit features an exuberant burst of art that explores the color red.  Twenty-five artists from metro Chicago are participating.  My abstract figurative art, Preacher Man and Young Lady With Long Pipe is in this exhibit, curated by Pam Hamilton.

Where:  Studio Oh is in Pilsen in the heart of the Chicago Arts District at 1837 S. Halsted Street, Chicago.  Hours: Tuesdays and Saturdays from 1 PM till 6 PM.  Outside of these hours, you are welcome to make an appointment.  Phone:    (773) 474-1070.

Young Lady With Long Pipe

Young Lady With Long Pipe – Limited edition fine art print.


2nd Fridays Gallery Night in the Chicago Arts District

The Chicago Arts District hosts 2nd Fridays Gallery Night, the monthly opening receptions at the galleries and artists’ studios centered around South Halsted and 18th Streets in Chicago. The event begins at 6:00pm and runs til 10pm.

Come visit the 30+ creative spaces in the Chicago Arts District at South Halsted and 18th Streets as they showcase an exciting display of art and artists from Chicago and beyond. This unique art community opens its doors, free of charge, and lets you get up close and personal with the art and artists.   Pick up a map at the information center at 1821 S. Halsted and explore the city’s most vibrant art community, the Chicago Arts District, where people meet ART!

Links

To see more of my figurative art, check out  http://www.leonsarantosartist.com/art-gallery/figurative-paintings/

Young Lady With Long Pipe – This Limited edition fine art print is also available at Artfinder  https://www.artfinder.com/product/young-lady-with-long-pipe/

Studio Oh Website:  http://www.art-studio-oh.com/

Chicago Arts District website:  http://chicagoartsdistrict.org/

Perceptions of the Parallaxis

Perceptions Of The Parallaxis

Works by Jason Brammer, Jason Hawk, and Keelan McMorrow

Special Exhibit    Jackson Junge Gallery 

November 2nd, 2012– January 6th, 2013

Opening Reception:  Friday, November 2nd, 2012, 6pm-9pm

“Perceptions Of The Parallaxis”, a new exhibit at Jackson Junge Gallery, 1389 N. Milwaukee Ave in Chicago, unites the distinctive styles of artwork from three local artists, Jason Hawk (sculpture), Keelan McMorrow (painting), and Jason Brammer (painted assemblages).  These Chicago based artists’ work is characterized by their unique methods of tampering with reality to communicate perceptions of their worlds.  The artists adopt the conceptual idea of parallax (wherein an object appears differently depending on the direction or position from which it is viewed) by incorporating their different perspectives into one exhibit.  From their individual vantage points, they each present a body of work that finds unity in their dedication to technique, craft and innovation.

Brammer, Hawk and McMorrow were initially drawn together through their mutual respect for each other’s artwork.  They began to find inspiration in one another’s innovation and work ethic prompting each to continually re-invent their ideas and craft.

Jason Brammer is a visual artist, painter, and muralist. He is known for his mixed media hand-painted assemblages, distinctive airbrushed paintings, meticulously-detailed drawings, and site-specific installations. In his mixed media work, Jason creates a unique melding of painted imagery with 3-dimensional elements, such as real antique parts, reclaimed wood, and other salvaged items he happens upon in the alleys by his studio. The objects are seamlessly integrated, creating an illusion that draws the viewer in for a closer look to see what is real and what is painted.

Sculptor Jason Hawk incorporates wit and layers of hidden meaning in his works.  One finds sculpture within sculpture, fabrication within a would-be natural landscape, and narrative vs. commentary in his clever constructions.  Hawk’s perspective is one that steps away from the overly conceptual.  A story is visually presented, whether it is interpreted as that of the artist or one that the viewer finds him/herself.

McMorrow finds his voice in painting.  His traditional painting techniques meld with contemporary notions of expressionism to create a style that borders on abstract, but centers on realism. This transports the viewer between classic and contemporary realms of art. There is something raw that translates into his imagery, almost as though one were seeing a visceral representation of a thought or dream.  Whereas some elements stand out as solid and recognizable, these dissolve into a cloudy abstraction that seems to emulate the ways our memories or thoughts are never wholly pristine.

These three friends display their artwork together with a common objective that different perspectives can mould and change from their individual positions.  Their technique becomes the parallaxis of art.

The exhibit runs from November 2nd, 2012 thru January 6th, 2013.  An opening reception with the artists is scheduled for the evening of Friday, November 2nd from 6-9pm.  Reception and exhibit are free to the public.

Exhibit Highlights:

“Lunar Fragmentation”, Jason Brammer (Acrylic, paint chips, antique hardware, salvaged wood, recycled leather, velvet, chain, and masonite, 18” x 9 ½” x 3 ½”) – This painting within a sculpture embodies strength, innovation, protection, and even decomposition, yet an image of serenity emerges from the fragmented center reminding the viewer that beauty lies within.  One’s attention is drawn to the seascape reflecting the moon, but the very moon is made of industrial material, which then awakens the senses to the binding leather, the hanging lock and chain and the rusting antiquity of the sculpture surrounding it.

“Ascension II”, Jason Hawk (powder-coated steel, copper-coated steel, chrome-plated steel, patinated steel and leather, 29” x 18” x 21”) – In this story-telling sculpture of an automaton figure there are elements of irony and contrast between the natural, emotional and industrial world.  Gentleness and desire is described in the gesture made by the figure constructed of hard and angular steel.  This robotic character inspires sympathy from the viewer as he holds out a hand to the butterflies surrounding him in his artificially winged garb.

“Horses”, Keelan McMorrow (acrylic on panel with installed lights, 48” x 30”) – This diptych of two horses bounding through an abstract field exudes the feeling of strength and energy.  It impresses on the viewer the authenticity of the raw desire to create, such as was first seen in cave dwellings. It simultaneously recalls the classic technique of painting and incorporates the contemporary element of physical illumination from within.

The Jackson Junge Gallery features the work of Laura Lee Junge and other contemporary artists.  The Gallery is open every day of the week, free of charge. Hours are Monday thru Saturday: 11am – 8pm, Sunday: 12 Noon – 5pm.  For more information, visit www.J2Gallery.com.

Milk, Honey, and a Left Arm

Black Cloud Gallery is proud to present Milk, Honey, and a Left Arm.  The exhibition features works by CJ Hungerman, Tracy Jones, and Black Cloud’s resident artist, Lauren Richards. The concepts of conflict, memory, and personal history are explored through the use of color, pattern, and found elements.

Black Cloud is located at 1909 S. Halsted St., in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago.

Opening Reception: Friday, June 1st, 7:00 – 10:00 PM
2nd Fridays: Friday, June 8th, 6:00 – 10:00 PM

Open during business hours: Friday, June 1st – Wednesday, June 27th

CJ Hungerman
I find that when creating my images, even though they have a whimsical feel to them, they do reflect conflict. All of our lives have struggles internally and externally. I believe that the Random Robots represent my personal pitfalls, conflicts, successes, all running around like little protons, neutrons, and electrons smashing together throughout ourselves, space, and time.

CJ Hungerman – Bot Bangers

Tracy Jones
Tracy G. Jones trusts art.
Color sets his course, even though it doesn’t tell him where they’re
going. Paint drives, often recklessly, swerving and veering, narrowly
avoiding ruin. Found objects and memories are always there to bail him out.
Art is not the most predictable of companions. Art isn’t even trustworthy. But Tracy G. Jones has never been locked up or hospitalized because of art, and art is always a good time, so yeah. Tracy G. Jones trusts art.
Maybe art trusts Tracy G. Jones, too.

Tracy Jones – Dumbass

Lauren Richards
I strive to keep my process spontaneous, youthful, and fresh. With impulse and randomness, mistakes are often made early on. I seek a certain level of precision and have an obsession with hand drawn perfection. Fears of creating contrived paintings cause me to make decisions that force me out of my comfort zone. Mistakes are corrected by straightening lines, covering them with collage, or blocking them out altogether. An initial problem is sometimes covered by a past error, only if it is the right solution. For me, spontaneity and a youthful approach to painting are key.

Lauren Richards – One for Two

Please visit www.blackcloudgallery.net or http://blackcloudart.wordpress.com/ for more information.