Perceptions of the Parallaxis

Perceptions Of The Parallaxis

Works by Jason Brammer, Jason Hawk, and Keelan McMorrow

Special Exhibit    Jackson Junge Gallery 

November 2nd, 2012– January 6th, 2013

Opening Reception:  Friday, November 2nd, 2012, 6pm-9pm

“Perceptions Of The Parallaxis”, a new exhibit at Jackson Junge Gallery, 1389 N. Milwaukee Ave in Chicago, unites the distinctive styles of artwork from three local artists, Jason Hawk (sculpture), Keelan McMorrow (painting), and Jason Brammer (painted assemblages).  These Chicago based artists’ work is characterized by their unique methods of tampering with reality to communicate perceptions of their worlds.  The artists adopt the conceptual idea of parallax (wherein an object appears differently depending on the direction or position from which it is viewed) by incorporating their different perspectives into one exhibit.  From their individual vantage points, they each present a body of work that finds unity in their dedication to technique, craft and innovation.

Brammer, Hawk and McMorrow were initially drawn together through their mutual respect for each other’s artwork.  They began to find inspiration in one another’s innovation and work ethic prompting each to continually re-invent their ideas and craft.

Jason Brammer is a visual artist, painter, and muralist. He is known for his mixed media hand-painted assemblages, distinctive airbrushed paintings, meticulously-detailed drawings, and site-specific installations. In his mixed media work, Jason creates a unique melding of painted imagery with 3-dimensional elements, such as real antique parts, reclaimed wood, and other salvaged items he happens upon in the alleys by his studio. The objects are seamlessly integrated, creating an illusion that draws the viewer in for a closer look to see what is real and what is painted.

Sculptor Jason Hawk incorporates wit and layers of hidden meaning in his works.  One finds sculpture within sculpture, fabrication within a would-be natural landscape, and narrative vs. commentary in his clever constructions.  Hawk’s perspective is one that steps away from the overly conceptual.  A story is visually presented, whether it is interpreted as that of the artist or one that the viewer finds him/herself.

McMorrow finds his voice in painting.  His traditional painting techniques meld with contemporary notions of expressionism to create a style that borders on abstract, but centers on realism. This transports the viewer between classic and contemporary realms of art. There is something raw that translates into his imagery, almost as though one were seeing a visceral representation of a thought or dream.  Whereas some elements stand out as solid and recognizable, these dissolve into a cloudy abstraction that seems to emulate the ways our memories or thoughts are never wholly pristine.

These three friends display their artwork together with a common objective that different perspectives can mould and change from their individual positions.  Their technique becomes the parallaxis of art.

The exhibit runs from November 2nd, 2012 thru January 6th, 2013.  An opening reception with the artists is scheduled for the evening of Friday, November 2nd from 6-9pm.  Reception and exhibit are free to the public.

Exhibit Highlights:

“Lunar Fragmentation”, Jason Brammer (Acrylic, paint chips, antique hardware, salvaged wood, recycled leather, velvet, chain, and masonite, 18” x 9 ½” x 3 ½”) – This painting within a sculpture embodies strength, innovation, protection, and even decomposition, yet an image of serenity emerges from the fragmented center reminding the viewer that beauty lies within.  One’s attention is drawn to the seascape reflecting the moon, but the very moon is made of industrial material, which then awakens the senses to the binding leather, the hanging lock and chain and the rusting antiquity of the sculpture surrounding it.

“Ascension II”, Jason Hawk (powder-coated steel, copper-coated steel, chrome-plated steel, patinated steel and leather, 29” x 18” x 21”) – In this story-telling sculpture of an automaton figure there are elements of irony and contrast between the natural, emotional and industrial world.  Gentleness and desire is described in the gesture made by the figure constructed of hard and angular steel.  This robotic character inspires sympathy from the viewer as he holds out a hand to the butterflies surrounding him in his artificially winged garb.

“Horses”, Keelan McMorrow (acrylic on panel with installed lights, 48” x 30”) – This diptych of two horses bounding through an abstract field exudes the feeling of strength and energy.  It impresses on the viewer the authenticity of the raw desire to create, such as was first seen in cave dwellings. It simultaneously recalls the classic technique of painting and incorporates the contemporary element of physical illumination from within.

The Jackson Junge Gallery features the work of Laura Lee Junge and other contemporary artists.  The Gallery is open every day of the week, free of charge. Hours are Monday thru Saturday: 11am – 8pm, Sunday: 12 Noon – 5pm.  For more information, visit www.J2Gallery.com.

Off The Streets : Expressions of Our Neighborhood

 In the spirit of this year’s Chicago Artists Month theme, “Art Block by Block”, “Off The Streets” will feature artists who add their flare to the personality of Wicker Park by living and working in the neighborhood.  These locals were found by word of mouth alone and chosen for their distinction among the masses of under-represented artists in the neighborhood.  Six talented individuals will represent the current artistic vibe of the neighborhood once so well known as an art studio village.  One of these artists, Laura Lee Junge, began painting in a neighborhood attic studio during Wicker Park’s development into an art haven.  Junge returns this earlier body of work to hang in the gallery she now co-owns, with the work of artists currently making Wicker Park their home and inspiration. 

One often hears the mantra of the starving artist struggling to get by, and indeed these artists have worked, and continue to work, to feed their passion for art.  “Their hard work and struggle endears them to our community and gives them a place in the development of a neighborhood vibe,” says Anna Vlaminck, curator of the exhibit.  “They may have helped you to pick out new furnishing for your home or to find an outfit to impress your date, or even made you a drink at your favorite haunt, but it’s their plight to find a niche in the art world that makes you remember them.  It’s the hidden talent and voice of an artist that adds the intrigue to the seemingly ordinary in Wicker Park.”  “Off The Streets” celebrates the success of the working neighborhood artist and provides the opportunity to see the rewards of their hard work.

This special group exhibit displays a history of Wicker Park artists, both past and present, and their influence in defining the neighborhood.  Themes touch on the psychological and satirical, street art, and abstraction in a variety of media.

The exhibit runs from October 1st through October 28th 2012.  An opening reception with the artists is scheduled for the evening of Friday, October 12th from 6-9pm.  Reception and exhibit are free to the public.

Exhibit Highlights:

“Skyhouse 2”, COVE (oil on canvas, 30” x 40”) – A bold white line tears through a landscape of brilliant color.  This painting’s style is developed from the artist’s beginning in graffiti. 

Skyhouse 2 by COVE

“[1626]2”, Erin Waser (oil on Panel, 32” x 32”) – Using round painted pixels in a large color range as a vehicle of manipulation, the artist explores how individual pixels interact to create a painting.  The multiple layers within each piece create a relationship between the surface and background, where objects at once form and disintegrate.

 

1626 [2] by Erin Waser

“Darwin Mach IV”, Ennis Martin (acrylic on canvas, 18” x 36”)– A Darwinian whale-like creature takes form in this colorful and inventive painting.

Darwin Mach IV by Ennis Martin

“Le Banc Parisien”, Edouard Pierre (photograph, 13” x 19”) – This photograph of a Parisian park bench is taken from a perspective that nearly abstracts the image.  The lines created from the green slats that make up the bench lead the eye to directly to the background which is frame by the edge of the bench itself.

 

Le Banc Parisien by Edouard Pierre

“Gilbert Herman the 2nd, King of Insanity”, Laura Lee Junge (oil on canvas, 52” x 46”) – This painting, a portrait of the artist’s father, is the foundation of her painting style and delves into the psychological and surreal.  A king-like figure, composed of elements that are both a part of himself and the perceptions of those around him, sits in a swirling and unstable environment.  The physical manifestation of the voices in his head and personality specific objects emerge and disappear in the strokes that define the king.

 

King of Insanity by L. Lee Junge

“Inheritance”, Joseph Knox (mixed media, 48” x 48”) – This mixed media piece layers a dark background with a light foreground in which one distinguishes the face of a young boy.  Upon closer inspection the dark background is revealed to be a pattern made of money and the light face is composed of a pattern of cigarettes.  The artist shows, when we are young, the lessons of financial responsibility and earning a wage seem positive, but they can in fact be correlated to what we learn about cigarettes.  When money becomes the sole pursuit of a person and isolates them from everyone it can indeed be addictive and dangerous.

 

Inheritance by Joseph Knox

Off The Streets” is part of Chicago Artists Month 2012, the seventeenth annual celebration of Chicago’s vibrant visual art community presented by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.  For more information, visit www.chicagoartistsmonth.org.

The Jackson Junge Gallery features the work of Laura Lee Junge and other contemporary artists.  The Gallery is open every day of the week, free of charge. Hours are Monday thru Saturday: 11am – 8pm, Sunday: 12 Noon – 5pm.  For more information, visit http://www.J2Gallery.com.

Apocalypse 2012 : Genesis 2013

APOCALYPSE 2012 : GENESIS 2013 – What if the predictions become reality?

Special Exhibit    Jackson Junge Gallery  

September 14th – October 28th, 2012

Opening Reception:  Friday, September 14th, 2012, 6pm-9pm

Both Nostradamus and the Mayan Calendar predict 2012 as the year that life, as we currently know it on Earth, will come to an end.   While the reality may not be quite so dramatic, the dawn of a new era may well occur before we know it.   Some folks envision the prophecies as an end, but others see them as an opportunity for a brighter beginning.

Jackson Junge Gallery asked artists to render their vision of such an apocalypse and, more importantly, portray their ideas of what a new world might resemble.  The artwork chosen for the upcoming exhibit  “APOCALYPSE 2012 : GENESIS 2013”,at Jackson Junge Gallery, 1389 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Chicago, running from September 14th to October 28th, 2012 illustrates exactly this duality.  An opening reception, free to the public, will be held Friday, September 14th from 6 – 9pm.

Humanity has always been fascinated by apocalyptic predictions, both frightening and redemptive.  Over 30 local, domestic and international artists’ interpret and illustrate where the change from 2012 to 2013 will take us.  The works explore themes of transition and re-birth.  Mediums include painting, photography, sculpture, print work, installation and digital.  The exhibit also includes a live performance by Chris Wille during the September 14th opening reception.

“We were very interested to see what the artists’ visions of the future would bring us.  It is quite a diverse array of intriguing ideas,” ” commented Chris Jackson, co-curator and director of Jackson Junge Gallery.

 Exhibit Highlights:

Newcomer (Xenicus Longipes, Extinct 1972)”, Kristina Knowski (Watercolor on Paper, 77” x 47”)  Many naturalists look to bird behavior to help predict and study the future.  When bird species begin to become extinct at an accelerated pace, it is only natural for us to fear for our own survival. Using her motif of a nonexistent unicorn, Knowski has painted a realm where reality is only imagined. In Newcomer drips of watercolor abstractly represent a non-specific after-world where the unicorn welcomes the now extinct Bush Wren, or Xenicus Longipes, into a realm of nonexistence. The concurrence of the nonexistence of the extinct bird and the imaginary unicorn force the viewer to question the reality of their own existence and its fragility.

 

The Simple Life”, Richard Laurent (Oil on Canvas, 24” x 24”) A Dinosaur saunters across the canvas, Starbucks mug in hand, while an unsurprised viewer watches from behind a curtain.  Laurent playfully toys with the idea that the future described by science fiction may be true in one respect, except we become the dinosaur.

The Simple Life by Richard Laurent

The Unfortunate Consequences of A Piece of Tail and A Bit of Greenery”, Caitlin Rose (Pen, Ink and Crayon, 9” x 12”)  A ring of white bunnies join hands in a circle around a twig with a single leaf, their heads reverently tilted up towards the full moon, while a limp and bleeding squirrel is sprawled on the sparse ground near them.   In this piece Rose portrays the fear that in a post-apocalyptic cultural environment, differences and individuality may not only be discouraged, but also be considered a threat to the well-being of the community.  The work explores both potential spiritual and religious consequences to this development.

 

Honeycomb Tower”, Justin Miller (Oil on Board, 20” x 32”)  The remains of a skyscraper convey a dark gothic atmosphere in the aftermath a world of worn disheveled buildings    Just as ruined cathedrals dot rural country sides, spires of twisted metal, steam, and rust prevail as a testament to prior architectural wonders.

 

“Anima”, Laura Lee Junge (Oil on Board, 56” x 42”)  Anima soul life, breath, vital force, or spirit…..  This peculiar portrait resonates with the contrast of a pleasing symmetry and an uncanny mystery.    “Anima” confronts the view by her very presence into asking who we think she is, and therefore what we think will come next. Have we conquered racism or instilled it deeper?  Are we fighting or celebrating?  Has anything changed?  What are we capable of changing?

 

APOCALYPSE 2012 : GENESIS 2013” is part of Chicago Artists Month 2012, the seventeenth annual celebration of Chicago’s vibrant visual art community presented by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.  For more information, visit www.chicagoartistsmonth.org.

The Jackson Junge Gallery features the work of Laura Lee Junge and other contemporary artists.  The Gallery is open every day of the week, free of charge. Hours are Monday thru Saturday: 11am – 8pm, Sunday: 12 Noon – 5pm.  For more information, visit http://www.J2Gallery.com.

Call For Artists, Apocalypse 2012: Genesis 2013

CALL FOR ARTISTS

Jackson Junge Gallery is immediately seeking artists’ submissions for an upcoming juried exhibition titled “APOCALYPSE 2012 : GENESIS 2013”.   It is a common belief that both Nostradamus and the Mayan Calendar predict 2012 as the year that life, as we currently know it, will come to an end.  If these doomsday predictions were to become a reality, the dawn of a new era would be upon us.

Artists in all media are encouraged to submit any work, or sketches and supporting documentation for proposals of future work, that gives their artistic interpretation of what this apocalypse would look like or, more importantly, looking forward to what a new world might resemble.  Some occurring themes might include:

– New Relationships/Attitudes Between People of the World

– Changes in Communication

– Political Revolution

– A Change in Environment or Atmosphere

– The Anticipated New Landscape or Architecture

Any interpretive pieces with environmental, moral, political or socially relevant tones will be welcomed.   Priority and preference will be given to new works of art.  This exhibit will begin in September of 2012 and run in conjunction with Chicago Artist Month.

Please send jpegs, title, medium, size, price and a brief description of how your piece relates to the theme of the exhibit to support@j2gallery.com or mail disk to Jackson Junge Gallery 1389 N. Milwaukee Ave.  Chicago, IL  60622 no later than June 21, 2012.  Artist will be notified by July 1, 2012 if their work has been selected to be included in the exhibit.

“Illumination” at Jackson Junge Gallery

Illumination

Photography by Kavan Geary

Opening Reception:  Friday, May 4, 6pm – 9pm at Jackson Junge Gallery

Exhibit Duration: May 4 – July 1, 2012

“Illumination”, a special exhibit at Jackson Junge Gallery, 1389 N. Milwaukee Ave in Chicago, features the uniquely posed and illuminated photography of Kavan Geary.  The ability to contain and utilize light in Geary’s work was inspired initially by classical painting, where cleverly layered translucent glazes give the appearance of being lit from behind.  Geary adapted this idea to photography, and quite literally, has made light his tool.  Light passes through the petals of flowers, glancing off their leaves and streaking across a stark background.  The result is a glowing, ethereal image.  In other instances light reflecting from the wings of a floating butterfly is ablaze in a trail of color imprinting its path.  “The goal is not so much to create photographs, as to create colorful paintings using natural elements as the paint and light as the brush,” says Geary.  “The camera becomes the canvas that records what I see.”  

In that vein, Geary has replaced the more traditional technique of photographs on paper with using actual canvas.   As an artist, he perceives many advantages to this adaptation.  Not only does it eliminate the problem of reflections from glass overlays, but it also gives his work added texture, in addition to enriching and deepening the colors.

Geary has employed a submersion technique for his new series of photographs that he calls his “Gothic Light” collection.  “Illumination”, is comprised primarily of these images, in which his floral subjects appear suspended in liquid and light.  With his photo lens also submerged, he captures unique characteristics of flowers placed in an environment that slightly alters the behavior of each petal and leaf.   

Geary’s choice of subject matter comes from the natural world.  His artistic expression is invoked from his subjects whether they are shot outdoors, or brought into the studio.  His photographs convey the same curiosity that exploring nature itself entails.   The compilation of light and nature transports the viewer to the calm, rejuvenated state of mind that Geary explains nature induces in him.

As the advent of spring transforms into summer, this exhibit at Jackson Junge Gallery captures moments of color and light as seen through the lens of Kavan Geary.  The exhibit runs from May 4 thru July 1, 2012. An opening reception with the artist is scheduled for the evening of Friday, May 4 from 6-9pm.  Reception and exhibit are free to the public.

The Jackson Junge Gallery features the work of Laura Lee Junge and other contemporary Chicago artists. 

Exhibit Highlights

“Calla Lilies”,  Three figures of white lean into light beams that grace the petals of the calla lilies.  The dark backdrop adds to the personification of the flowers as the viewer is enticed to wonder how and why these figures are surrounded by darkness but seem to have found their salvation.

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“Paper Kite”,  A moment of movement is cleverly captured as the fluttering of a butterfly’s wings becomes a stroke, not unlike that of a paintbrush, across the colorful background of a forest. 

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“Mums”,   In a setting of layered colorful light, three mums proudly present themselves in the foreground of a misty environment.  The yellow of their petals seems to signify the vibrancy and energy they contain while dwelling in a still and serene space.

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